DHS Aging Services staff member receives national award for safeguarding older Georgians

January 30, 2017

ATLANTA – A Georgia Department of Human Services (DHS) staff member has been nationally recognized for his invaluable contributions and work in safeguarding older and disabled Georgians. 

The National College of Probate Judges (NCPJ) awarded Carleton F. Coleman with its 2017Judge Isabella Horton Grant Guardianship Award. The NCPJ honor recognizes demonstrated leaders in the field of guardianship for adults and/or minors.

As the field operations manager of the Public Guardianship Office (PGO) for DHS Division of Aging Services, Coleman is responsible for the safety and protection of elderly and disabled adults statewide. PGO serves as a surrogate decision maker for people under guardianship, coordinating and monitoring services to support the care, education and welfare of adults in state care. DHS serves as the guardian of last resort for more than 800 Georgians.

“We are fortunate to have leaders in our state like Mr. Coleman, who has continuously answered the call to serve Georgia’s most vulnerable adults,” Gov. Nathan Deal said. “Georgia is ranked the No.1 state for business, and with employees like Mr. Coleman, it is quickly becoming the No.1 state for compassionate service.”

In announcing the award, the NCPJ cited Coleman’s leadership, calling him the “perfect example” of the dedication the award’s namesake showed to the most vulnerable populations. The award is presented to the recipient at the NCPJ Spring Conference each year. The 2017 Spring Conference is in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

“I am honored to work with individuals such as Mr. Coleman, who truly have a heart to serve the vulnerable people of our state,” DHS Commissioner Robyn A. Crittenden said. “Mr. Coleman’s tireless dedication to adults in our guardianship program helps to achieve the Department’s vision of stronger families for a stronger Georgia.”

About the National College of Probate Judges
The National College of Probate Judges was organized in 1968 to improve the administration of justice in courts with probate jurisdiction. The college was established in response to public concern with the time and costs involved in estate administration.  It is the only national organization exclusively dedicated to improving probate law and the probate courts.